Dear Sedition Caucus:

We see you.

We see you from across the country, and we see you from across the street. We see that you have no respect for the tenets of this nation, and we see that you do not care about the will of the people who put you in office.

We are not only Black, Latinx, LGBTQ, young, female, liberal, urban and poor. You can not ignore us thinking that we aren’t “your” people, because we are also white, wealthy, middle-aged, seniors, Christian, suburban, small town, and conservative. …


image via Depositphotos

Dear Family:
I’ve been told that I’m too blunt. And honestly, while I’d love to have better skills in diplomacy, I can think of far worse things than being upfront and honest about important matters. So I’ll start in the same spirit that I’m known for: I’m writing to ask you to vote for Joe Biden for President.

I’m being blunt about this, and I’m doing something I’ve never done before with extended family because this is, in the most profound sense, an election that will either break our nation or save it.

I realize that simply being related by…


I’m making myself some lunch when my seventeen-year-old walks into the kitchen. He’s just woken up. The summer that should have been his first real job has become the summer he does random yard work for neighbors (while wearing a mask) and sleeps a lot.

He passes me and goes straight to the medicine cabinet. A moment later he’s standing in front of me holding out the fancy new touchless thermometer I bought at the beginning of the pandemic. The digital numbers lit up across its display screen read 100.3F.

I swallow hard, glancing from the thermometer to his widened…


I am tired. And I am angry. Livid in fact. Filled with rage. My rage isn’t more important than anyone else’s, it isn’t as pressing as some, nor as poignant as others, but it is mine, and it is real.

I’m fortunate — in many ways — and I acknowledge that. I work from home, I’m not the primary breadwinner, my husband’s job is safe, no one in my family has gotten sick, I live in a small community, in a big house, with lots of space to go outside. I ought to be grateful. And I am. …


I started school as the smartest kid in the class, which is not something I’d recommend. When I landed in first grade already knowing how to read like a pro, my teacher — a well-intentioned but lazy woman who smoked like a chimney in our classroom during recess — would have me read out loud to the rest of the kids during storytime.

Needless to say, my role as class smarty-pants didn’t gain me a lot of friends. …


It’s the end not only of a year, but also of a decade, so it seems to lend itself to some extra examination. Here’s my end of the decade wrap-up.

It was 2012 when I sat down to write a PhD dissertation and wound up with a novel instead. And through the ensuing years, I’ve published thirty-four books under three different pen names. I’ve had books in Spanish, French, and German; I’ve had paperbacks in Barnes and Noble brick and mortar stores; I’ve had ebooks, paperbacks, and audiobooks at all retailers; and I hit the USA Today list once. I’ve…


Like most people I know, I have a love-hate relationship with social media. It provides endless entertainment (cute animal memes anyone?), and useful information (best newsletter providers for authors), but it’s also filled with poison.

Unlike most people, I’m tethered to social media in a different way because of my profession. Writers don’t get to ignore it. At the very least we need certain accounts to run ads for our books, and the reality is, even the biggest most successful traditionally published authors these days use social media to reach new readers and engage with existing fans.

But in…


I have no problem admitting that like a lot of people the term privilege can leave me a little cold. I understand the concept and I agree with it, but it’s reductive. Like so much of the discourse in our culture today, the concept of privilege often lacks the nuance that exists in real everyday life.

But that caveat being given, it can be hard to find a better term for what we all live with, encounter, and possess, throughout our lives, and in our careers as writers. In the six plus years I’ve been a professional writer I’ve…


Via Depositphotos

As a writer, I live in a world where words matter a great deal. The exact adjective I choose to describe something, the exact title I give to a book, the exact combination of sentences and phrases and ideas that make my story mine. And writers know better than anyone the power that words can have. Words inspire, incite, encourage, and entreat. Great words from the mouths of great human beings last longer than generations.

And vile words cast a pall over entire nations and peoples and moments in history.

My love of words might be in my DNA…


Photo by Stephan Henning on Unsplash

I love personality tests. Those things like Myers-Briggs that tell you all about how your brain works. I love them in large measure because they explain me to myself. You’d think after fifty-two years on planet Earth I’d have a handle on at least that one thing — me — but the fact is, it took me until I was middle-aged to begin the process of analyzing myself and how I function in the world.

One of the biggest things I’ve learned after ten years of self-analysis, is that my intuitive nature can be a blessing and a curse…

SE Reed/Selena Laurence

Romance Author | Coffee Drinker | Breaker of Tropes | Mother of Doodles. Weekly newsletter: https://smarturl.it/selenanews

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